Doubling Down on the CC10 Caracal Carbine

Discussion in 'Blog Forum' started by christophereger, Feb 7, 2014.

  1. christophereger

    christophereger New Member

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    From the desert sands of the UAE came last year a modern pistol caliber carbine. Set up in 9mm, the Caracal CC10 used the same mags as the company's growingly popular pistol line while its carbine length barrel gave improved sight picture, accuracy, and range.

    Now only if we could get our hands on one

    16a-na-72991-17.jpg
    (The gun first appeared in trade-shows in the Middle East in the summer of 2012)


    Design

    With an all-steel upper and a polymer lower, the CC10 was introduced to the world in June 2012, showing up for the first time in the states at the 2013 Shotshow six months later. While it looks very similar to Taurus's new CT9 carbine, it's all Caracal.

    caracal-cc10-20.jpg

    The internals seem to function the same as the Caracal F series pistol. This include the very short travel trigger, magazines with 10, 15 and 18 round capacity (that are, yes, interchangeable with the pistol family), an ambidextrous magazine release, quick barrel exchange (to swap from a SBR-required 9.3-inch barrel to a civilian legal 16.1-inch on demand) as well as full tactical rails.

    Like all the way down the top of the gun tactical rails.

    caracal-cc10-9mm-carbine-1024x680-18.jpg
    (See the big honking lever on the back of the pistol grip-- its a safety)

    The gun is very safe. Almost redundantly so. Besides a trigger-blocking safe, and a bolt anti recoil device, there is also a XD-style beavertail grip safety that must be depressed before the gun will fire. While a grip safety on a carbine seems overkill, you cannot argue that it doesn't contribute to an extra peace of mind-- and is something you don't find on the Beretta CX4.

    Let's see it in action:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPrEcaE3Yws

    The CC10 showed up again at the 2014 Shotshow, seen here close up by the Spartan TC Team at the Media day a few weeks ago.

    Specs

    • Total Length .................................. 885 mm > 34.84 in
    • Barrel Length (LB) ........................... 410 mm > 16.1 in
    • Barrel Length (SB) ............................ 235 mm > 9.3 in
    • Width ............................................... 44 mm > 1.73 in
    • Height ............................................ 188 mm > 7.28 in
    • Weight ............................... With LB 2,917 g > 6,40lbs
    • ( without ammunition )
    • With SB 2,729 g > 6,01lbs
    • Trigger Weight: ........................1,3-1,5 kg. (2,8-3,3 lbs)
    • Stock ......................................................... Synthetic
    • SafelyDevices .......................... Manual Safety, Trigger
    • blocking safe, Bolt anti recoil
    • Grip Areas ............................ Anti Slide (Texturized)
    • Frame ......................................................... Steel
    • Barrel ....................................................... Removable
    • Rail Up .................................... Scopes for M.I.L. STD
    • Butt Stock ..................... Removable with Storage Area
    • Rail Down ............................. Accessories M.L.L. STD
    • Magazine ............................................. Ambidextrous

    Why would you care?

    Pistol caliber carbines have been popular ever since World War 1. In the last stages of that conflict, the first submachine guns-- the Bergman MP18 and the Thompson SMG came about. These short and handy rifles carried large quantities of compact, lightweight, and portable pistol ammunition. Fast forward to WWII and beyond and this same class of firearm became the M3 Grease Gun, the STEN, and the Sterling.

    By the 1960s the UZI, Swedish K-Gun and others replaced it. Around the same time, these guns, in semi-automatic format with longer barrels to remain legal, found rapid adoption for both sport target recreation, and hunting as well as home defense applications. By the 1990s, manufacturers specifically were designing new pistol caliber carbines such as the Marlin Camp Carbine, the Ruger PC9, and the Hi-point 995 due to the increasing demand.

    cc10-21.jpg

    Now we see the Caracal as the next in this evolutionary process. These compact carbines are easy to shoot, accurate, have low-recoil, and are effective out to 100-yards and beyond.

    Getting your own

    Caracal debuted the gun at SHOT Show 2013, saying they were planning to send these out to retailers by the second quarter of last year. Well we haven't seen any show up for sale just yet. The fact that the company still lists it on the website and brought it back to SHOT this year means that it isn't vaporware just yet.

    cc10-aim-19.jpg

    It's possible that they could be held up in import as the BATFE has really funny requirements on bringing rifles into the country from overseas that hold more than ten-rounds.

    Sadly, since Caracal only has manufacturing facilities in the UAE and Germany, that would limit these guns to only taking a ten-shot mag (like the abortive Taurus CT9), which would kill their value on the market.

    Still, the company may be able to ship in parts and assemble them in the States with some US-made complaint subassemblies, making them workable. This is what Beretta does with their CX4 series guns, which are made partially in Italy and assembled, finished at their plant in Maryland.

    taurus-carnine-22.jpg
    (Taurus is handicapped with its CT series of carbines, made in Brazil, that are limited by law to 10-round mags due to BATFE import requirements)

    If Caracal can get the CC10 in the stores for under $600 (the price of the new Taurus 9mm/40cal carbine, Kel-Tec SUB2000 and Beretta CX4) it has enough features to beat the much cheaper Hi-Point 995/4045 series at their own game-- plus did we mention they take Caracal pistol mags too?

    Should any of our members here find one, please let us know.

    And post lots of feedback!